Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Welsh Haplogroups

Some years past, my decision to have my DNA tested was finally made.  For years [some 50+], the genealogy virus had lead me to what seemed my own JONES family origins.  North Wales it was, or at least I thought this was the case.   Uncertainty gave way to verification as my DNA haplogroup returned R1b1b2 [now classified as R1b1a2 ].   The following table shows the haplogroups for my JONES surname from 2011 and 2016.  They are then compared to haplogroups from North Wales reported in 2011.

In 2011, my R1b1 haplogroup made up around 82% of folks seeking their DNA from North Wales.  Those in my JONES surname groups made up 75% of this R1b haplogroup.  From North Wales indeed it would seem.   Other haplogroup percents are shown, which again follow the same pattern as North Wales.  The 2016 group shows that several other haplogroups have been reported to carry the JONES surname which indicates a lot more folks have become interested in all this DNA stuff.

Now the following figure shows roughly how this R1b haplogroup got to Wales.  [It was drawn when my haplogroup was still R1b1b2]  How the genes did flow, from A to R1b some 60,000 years in the making.


Tuesday, March 15, 2016

New...with the...Old

Welsh history presents its own set of problems for the genealogist.  As time changes, the names of places frequently change in response to the social and political pressures of the day.  Present day names are often derived from older names.  [A change due to language perhaps.]  As one climbs out their Welsh family tree, these changes may not be recognized as one goes back in time.  For example, the following list shows the present day names of the counties of Wales as compared to the much older Welsh names.

                                   Anglesey (Ynys Mon)
                                   Caernarvon (Arfon)
                                   Denbigh (Dinbvch)
                                   Flint (Flint)
                                   Merioneth (Meirionydd)
                                   Montgomery (Trefaldwyn)
                                   Cardigan (Ceredigion)
                                   Radnor (Maesyfed)
                                   Pembroke (Penfro)
                                   Carmarthen (Caerfyddin)
                                   Brecon (Brycheiniog)
                                   Glamorgan (Morgannwy)
                                   Monmouth (Monmouth)


Names are taken from "Welsh Genealogical Research", by Charles M. Franklin, Heritage House, Indianapolis, IN, 1995. p.4.

Monday, February 8, 2016

New Blogs

One can not discuss Welsh genealogy for very long without running into issues involving the JONES surname, and issues with other WELSH surnames.  Two new blogs are started with hopes to address these topics. "JONES SURNAME CENTRAL" one is titled.  Its purpose is to provide a place to discuss the Jones surname from a variety of angles...the origin, history, and chronology...and any other subject that might be related.  The second blog is titled "WELSH SURNAME CENTRAL".  Its purpose is to provide a place to discuss other Welsh surnames as they relate to the Welsh patrilineal naming structure so important to understand among those genealogist seeking to trace their Welsh family trees.  Come join the fun.  You can place comments for subjects or topics that you think are important to address....or questions you might have regarding these subjects.  The blogs are:

"JONES SURNAME CENTRAL" at   tjgjsc.blogspot.com

"WELSH SURNAME CENTRAL" at   tjgwsc.blogspot.com

I post this information on this blog since many readers share interest in Welsh genealogy.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Royal Authority

Understanding Welsh history and its role in the formation of many Welsh family trees, is a major aspect of Welsh genealogy.  English annexation of Wales started along the border area where many Welsh families intermarried with those who came to claim title to the land.  Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, and what came to be called "The Plantagenets" all had something to do with that mixing of the X and Y chromosomes.  In 1272, Edward I inherited the throne of England.  His Welsh neighbors took top priority and the results of his partial annexation are clearly standing today.  A book by John E. Morris describes what occurred to advance this undertaking.


The Welsh Wars of Edward I is its title.  Many of our Welsh family trees still bend into various shapes, even today, as a result.  A grasp of this history will often help us tree climbers.

Originally published by Oxford at the Clarendon Press in 1901, the cover shown above is my copy published by Combined Books edition, 1996. [Pennsylvania]  Genealogical tables are contained within showing many of the interrelationships which took place.  Raids, castles and battles...who could ask for more.

Friday, November 20, 2015

Tribe of the Marches

From the same reference (Burke 1884) on p. 1035, he presents Tudor Trevor.  The following is recorded:

"Tudor Trevor (Lord of Hereford, Whittington, and both Maelors; founder of the Tribe of the Marches, surnamed Trevor, from the place of his birth, co. Denbigh, son of Ynyr ap Cadforch, Lord of Whittington and both Maelors, in Powys, by Rheingar, his wife, dau. and heir of Lluddoca ap Caradoc Vreichfras, Lord of Hereford, in South Wales."

A fairly long list of families that descended from Tudor Trevor are then given including "Jones of Llwynon".  After 50 years of genealogy tree climbing, it would show that my family roots are here.

                                  "Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or."


Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Royal Tribes of Wales (V.)

As given in Burke, the fifth Royal Tribe of Wales is as follows:

                   Jestyn ap Gwrgant, Tributary Prince of Glamorgan, Founder of the V. Royal Tribe

                                               Gu. three chevronels ar.

This would be a red shield with three pyramid shaped set of parallel lines starting from the bottom right and left of the shield, meeting in the center at equal distance.

The Chevron is thought to have been adopted from the bow of a war saddle, which rose high in front. [Burke, p. xxxi]

The reference is : Burke, B.B., The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales; A Registry of Armorial Bearings From The Earliest To The Present Time.  Harrison, 59, Pall Mall, 1884. p. lxii.

                                                  

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Royal Tribes of Wales (IV.)

The country between the Wye and the Severn (rivers) was called Ferlys.  In Burke, the founder of the 4th Royal Tribe of Wales, was Ethelystan Glodrydd, called "Tributary Prince of Ferlys".  His arms are given:

           "Quarterly, first and fourth, az three boars' heads cabossed sa. ; second and third, per bend sinister, ermine and erminois, over all a lion ramp. or, which latter was the coat of his mother Rhingor, dau. and heir of Gronwy ap Tudor-Trevor, Lord of Whittington, co. Salop."

                                                                                                         [Burke, 1884 ed., p. lxii ]

Quarterly means that the shield is divided into four equal size parts numbered from the upper right.  Descent from the father is shown in the 1st and 4th quadrant of the shield, and the material side is shown in the 2nd and 3rd quadrants.  Three boars's heads colored black with the heads of the boar looking right forward, full-faced, with nothing of the neck showing. [shield background colored blue]

The maternal side shows a gold colored lion standing upright with a bend [representing a shoulder-belt, or scarf] drawn from the upper left to the right base of the shield.  The terms "ermine" means a white field with black spots, and "erminois" a black field with white spots. [representing furs of animals]

The following chart shows this family tree through Tudor Trevor (JC-1).


The eldest son of Tudor Trevor (JC-1) is Gronwy (JD-1) who had Rhingor (JE-3) [daughter and only heir] who was the mother of Ethelystan Glodrydd [Elystan Gloodrydd] (JF-6) the founder of the IV. Royal Tribe of Wales.